New York, New York.. a place for everyone ?

I first visited New York when I was in my late teens and I was petrified. I had watched far too many 80’s cop shows set in the Big Apple that made me think that I was susceptible to becoming another crime statistic. I remember walking through one of the department stores and a young boy was shadow boxing, watching himself in the mirror when suddenly the old lady with him, I’m guessing his granny shouted out “Somebody’s gonna take you out Michael”. Oh this place was far more scary then where I came from.

So when one of my daughters autistic interests became New York and my husband decided that I should take her to visit it for a few days I had my reservations.

A lot of things about our trip to New York concerned me. This was at a time when she was going through the diagnosis process for Asperger’s and I was only just starting to get a handle on all her sensory issues. I asked her over and over if she was sure that she would be able to make the trip, and she repeatedly replied yes, she was so excited.

Our first issue was the train, Bristol to London, then London to Heathrow. These journeys turned out to work surprisingly well, I had tuned in to the fact that headphones really made a huge difference to her and so she plugged in and away we went. Next up the plane Heathrow to New York, which again went really well. It would seem that the journey was just about the right amount of time for her not to go to the toilet (see my previous blogs on this subject) and the snacks that I had packed for her kept her going.

I had recalled from my previous experience that the taxi situation was quite a difficult one. The journey from JFK into New York is a fair distance and the bouncing of the cabs tend to make you feel a bit sick. I forewarned her of this and yet again no problems. By the time we reached the hotel I realised that a lot of my fears about this trip were not going to materialise. We were lucky enough to stay at the https://www.lottenypalace.com/ A wonderful hotel, with a fabulous bakery, which meant that in the mornings we were able to grab something to eat without the fussiness of having to be seated and the formalities of breakfast being served. We visited just before Christmas and we treated to the most amazing decorations, including a copy of the hotel made out of gingerbread.

Our itinerary for the next few days was extensive. We visited the Empire State building, which meant that my daughter had to tackle her fear of elevators. 102 floors whizzed by as we shot up the elevator like Charlie in Charlie and the chocolate factory, luckily we didn’t come out through the roof. She didn’t enjoy the experience, she kept her headphones on and closed her eyes, so I am particularly thankful for the speediness of this lift. I too had to overcome my fear of heights to be able to take in the most spectacular views on a beautiful clear crisp day.

The Statue of Liberty, meant not only a long walk to the point of where you catch the ferry but we spent a great deal of time walking around this grand lady. Soaking up both the sunshine (yes it was super sunny) and the history. We stopped and ate and this for me has become a major lifeline, it is very important that she stops and eats, it gives her a chance to get back on track. You do not want to see her if she doesn’t get a chance to eat, all I’ll say is that it is a bit like the incredible hulk, you don’t want to see her angry.

As my daughter was only ten at the time I decided that it would be nice to see some of the sights that were more suitable to a child and this included a visit to Santa’s Grotto at Macy’s. We managed to obtain tickets to skip the wait in line queue but we still got a chance to take in all the magic. It’s a must for all children, big kids too. This particular Santa was very accommodating without me having to point any issues out and he made her as relaxed as he could, after all he may be Santa but he’s also a stranger and children with Asperger’s don’t usual like strangers. We came away with a wonderful photo that I will treasure for forever.

A trip to the Zoo in Central Park was a must, we got to see the amazing bears, seals and much more including the snow leopards, which was another fascination of hers. The Zoo is a great size for children on the spectrum because it has a lot of space around it so it doesn’t feel too enclosed and yet at the same time it a decent amount of animals for the children to see. Take some time to visit the Tisch Children’s Zoo also at the same location with its goats, another obsession, and Manhattans only cow. https://centralparkzoo.com/

New York before Christmas is crazy busy and all the decorations and lights are amazing. Who could not take their child to the Rockefeller Tree and not reenact the scene from Home Alone 2 where Macaulay Culkin is reunited with his mother. Oh yes that was a highlight for me. The tree is absolutely spectacular, out of this world. Check out this link to learn more about the history of the tree and the lighting ceremony. https://www.rockefellercenter.com/holidays/rockefeller-center-christmas-tree-lighting/

Our trip was topped off by a theatre trip to see Elf at Madison Square Garden, which was planned for 7:30 pm. This was the only time that I had big concerns about how much of a sensory overload my daughter might be having. You see up until this point, due to our jet lag, we had been getting up really early and walking the streets whilst most were still in bed. Yep even in New York they have much quieter times of the day. Our walk through Times Square and down to Madison Square Garden was met with hundreds, thousands, maybe even millions (OK that’s an exaggeration, I think ) of people all out walking through the streets off to parties, off to bars, even still off to the shops to purchase Christmas presents. My daughter however sailed through these people as though she was a New Yorker. Whilst I was bumping into people and apologising, something which us British people are very good at, she continued walking through the throng of people like she had no cares in the world.

Once we returned from our trip and the pair of us had told all our tales to the family I spoke to her about how she was on that last day and asked what she was feeling as she walked through those busy streets. “New York” she said ” I love it. People there don’t judge you. They don’t expect you to say sorry when you bump into them, they don’t expect you to say Good Morning and make polite chit chat, they just let you be who you are. I think I’m going to move there when I’m older”.

Three years later she still has the plan to move to New York, she loves cities, she finds the people much more accommodating. I feel that she has the chance to fit in and she’s right people are not so judgemental because they see all walks of life.

As for me, I love New York too, these days I feel more like Carrie Bradshaw when I visit rather than a pending crime statistic and when she moves there guess who will be her first visitor.

Author: nothingtoseeheremovealongnow

I am 45 and married with 3 daughters, aged 9, 14 and 16. My 14 year old daughter was diagnosed with Asperger's when she was 10 years old and although we have many lows we also have a lot of high's.My blog is a way for me to express myself.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s